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Kindle Fire benchmarks – performance testing score in Quadrant, AnTuTu and more

From all the Kindle Fire reviews I read, none of them put the device to the test to see how it compares against other Android devices in terms of raw speed. The reason? You’ll need to root and install the Android Market to be able to install the test suites. We did all that (see our Android Market Install tutorial) and the results are here for your enjoyment! The applications used for benchmarking are Quadrant, AnTuTu, RealPi, GLBenchmark and System Test.

In conclusion, the performance is decent but by no means stellar, with the Kindle Fire score below many new Android smartphones on the market today. We can’t wait until we get our new Nook Tablet and put it to the test as well.

1. Kindle Fire Quadrant Score – 2058

Quadrant is probably the best known Android benchmarking suite. Kindle Fire managed to achieve a score of 2058, nothing to write home about to be honest, compared with my Samsung Galaxy GS II Skyrocket that reached over 3000.

 

2. AnTuTu Kindle Fire Benchmark Score – 4738

AnTuTu is another popular benchmark applications and again Kindle Fire was beaten by Samsung Galaxy S II, although not by a large margin

3. RealPi Kindle Fire Benchmark Score

RealPi focuses purely on the CPU/memory speed while crunching Pi decimals.

4. GLBenchmark Kindle Fire Benchmark Scores

The majority of tests in GLBenchmark focuses on the graphic performance and rendering quality. GLBenchmark also displays a lot of details about the internal hardware.

5. System Test Kindle Fire Benchmark Score -3521

System test is a general benchmark suite focusing on the following components: CPU and ROM tests, 2D graphics test, 3D graphics test, Database IO test, SD card IO test.

  • James Ying-fung Loh

    This is very mis-leading talking only about specs and speed. Tablet is not a hardware but a combination of hardware, software, and user experiences. If the scrolling is so slow that hinder from a proper reading of a web page, it is not good. If the speed is amazing but doing only tricky and fancy drawing on its own, it is bad!

    Don’t fall into the old habit of comparing specs which is, to be true, only a marketing scheme!

  • I absolutely agree with you, the benchmarks are just numbers and don’t properly describe the overall experience. After all, MS-DOS on a 286 will work faster than Windows 7 on a quad core. However, there are a lot of people interested in the numbers, and how they compare against similar devices, so we do provide them, for those that are interested…